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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
of kissinger associates and current ceo of foreign policy. what is foreign policy? >> guest: the fp group is a group that publishes foreign policy magazine. the foreign policy web site, which is now much bigger than the magazine. almost three and a half million visitors a month to the web site and runs programs on international issues. >> host: mr. rothkopf, in "power inc." you have a chapter about a swedish goat. >> guest: i wanted to go back to the sore instory of the company, and of course, companies one form of oar existed since the beginning of time. the oldest corporation that is still in existence is a swedish company that started perhaps a thousand years ago when a goat wandered away from its owner and came back with red horns because it had drunk from a stream that was full of copper ore, and the owner came back and found the stream and started digging for copper, and that became a copper company, and became a company called staracopaburg and that means great copper mountain, and now they're in the paper business but $20 billion a year in sales, it's bigger than a couple of dozen
spoke thursday about the future of u.s. foreign policy. the syrian civil war, and other challenges facing the middle east. this came at a forum hosted by "foreign-policy" magazine. she also answer questions. this is an hour. [applause] >> madam secretary, today we solve all your problems. nothing left to worry about, really. actually, the office of policy planning and the foreign policy group made a bet we could bring together leaders from inside government from leaders outside government to have a real discussion about the future of american foreign policy. is there to say based on the conversation we had today that that has paid off. that is especially thanks to say paanalysts and participants to mid really impressive than insightful interventions over the course of the day. i also want to give a special thank you to people at the foreign-policy group and policy planning office, who were the heart and soul of putting today together. if you've given a quick round of applause. -- you could give them a quick round of applause. [applause] we made a second bet that david could shine a
deals. >> miss merkel conducts foreign policy holding a weapon in her hands. >> the government takes a different view. the defense minister argued that exports to saudi arabia could help stabilize the situation in the middle east. we spoke to a defense analyst. i asked him how likely it is that saudi arabia could use these german tanks to put down uprisings and crush dissent. >> the boxer tanks which are discussed today are an armored vehicle used for transport purposes, not so much for riot control. it is a german-dutch corp. project. it is used mainly for the transportation to protect against insurgents in afghanistan. it is not designed so much for riot control or to control insurgencies, but more to protect the forces of germany and other countries in the field. >> the opposition is accusing the government of flouting court -- german guidelines. is that fair to say? >> the current policy guidelines for arms export in germany go back to the red green government a couple years ago. the current government is more or less responsible for the current guidelines. there is room for impr
paid too little attention to this changing of the guard. what will their foreign policy look like? i have to great guests to shed light on all of that. welcome. liz. you have a very tough blog posting on the excellent counsel on foreign relations website which you say china's 18th party congress was a heartbreaker. it was a triumph of the conservative party. the candidate will the strongest credentials were left high and high. they took their place among the top seven. you see this as a real kind of reinstitution of a hard line conservative group. >> i do. i think this was a disappointing outcome from the 18th party congress. if you look at this leadership group they bring a wealth of experience to the table. collectively these seven men have governed roughly half the provinces. a number of them do have experience at the national level with the economy or political arena but by in large they are distinguish eed by their lack o distinction. none of them have been associated with an innovative program or policy reform on the economic or policy front. i think the fear in beijing is they
. >> ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it's a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel and our great country, and it's almost a mystical relationship when you think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it's due to the fact that this is not just jewish support, we're only 2% of the population in the united states. it's because we have shared values, shared enemies, and islamic terrorism. that many people in the united states view israel as the holy land not just jews but non-jews as well. there's a remarkable time when there is so much polarization between the republicans and democrats. it's one of the few foreign policy issues that actually unite democrats and republicans. >> what -- the future of the jews, is your book title provocative in any way? do you mean to be? >> i mean it to be. the question is can of peopl
basis on which to determine british policy on this though? when the foreign secretary understands statehood is not a gift to be given, but a right to be acknowledged. i won the foreign secretary of the united kingdom abstains tomorrow, it will not be a measure of our growing influence. it would be a confirmation of our growing irrelevance to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe i believe will be the search for peace across europe i believe will be an overwhelming majority of 102 members of the general assembly voting for enhanced observer status for palestinians. that can and must send a signal to the palestinians that diplomatic effort in the path of politics or not the path of pockets of violence to his two state solution. let's be honest, in recent days, hamas in the midst of the conflict with israel welcome the secretary general, prime minister v-chip comforter set turkey, iraq, jordan come the pulse to any authority, saudi arabia
-- there was like -- there is a lack of talk i guess as far as obama's -- foreign policies also. so i just want to -- i want to see what you say about that, too. >> stephanie: i'm sorry. about his foreign policy? >> yeah. about his foreign policies. there's no real path that i see by that. where they -- where they're going with that, i guess. okay. that's a little doughy. he was spitballing a term paper. somehow the fiscal cliff got in the foreign policy. here is monday morning. it is all right. >> yeah, we just flush the lines with that one. >> stephanie: sure. a little telephone call and blow. >> yeah. >> is there something happening we should have a policy for that. >> said he was a college student so my guess is that if he's up this early he's probably still up from last night. >> stephanie: he's been up all night. things are a little doughy in there. that's okay. it is like jim -- >> give him 30 minutes. >> stephanie: last-minute ideas. curious your thoughts on -- >> stuff that happened -- [ ♪ "jeopardy
in every debate -- even the foreign policy debate. the american people are on the side of the president and democrats who are making this case. that is not to say that there should not be spending as part as this debate. there has been over $1 trillion in spending cuts. that is a part of this debate that gets lost. just because washington has a short memory does not mean we should all have one and that there has already been sacrifice on behalf of the american people through those domestic discretionary cuts. we are excited. c.a.p. has been a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we have talked about medicare savings that can improve and strengthen the program and address rising national health expenditures. we will have more to say on the issue of taxes. we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today, who has played a fundamental role over the last several years. he has been part of every negotiation that has taken place. he is still an optimist. that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in th
in the senate really has been his work in foreign relations, and in the area of foreign policy. i think the senate would be losing a giant in that record. i don't know how that directly impacts the state of massachusetts, but certainly it certainly is never good to lose a senator with that much seniority. >> what about senator patrick of massachusetts. what would happen here? he's got two years left in his term. he could run for senate if he left, i don't know if he'd have to step down, or he might even leave to go to a cabinet post. do you think scott brown might run for governor? >> i think he would be better advised to run for governor. now there's also talk and this being massachusetts where the democrats run everything and there are about 11 republicans left to complain, there's talk that they might 15 finagle the rules again that he's not old school democratic enough to do that. there was rumblings in the boston her and would that said that there was some talk on beacon hill that the democrats the legislature might go back to the old system that they changed so that mitt romney wo
a long background of dealing in foreign policy issues. but she's also somebody who hasn't been willing to answer some of the hard questions that many of my colleagues have had regarding the situation in benghazi. and i think that demonstrates questions about her judgment and how she would be -- how independent she would be as secretary of state. that's obviously something very important in a secretary of state. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. the president and other folks are hoping for a deal by christmas. is it doable? >> i hope so. i think there's at least in my view an opportunity here for us to do something that's really good for the country. but it has to be -- it's got to be entitlement reform included in anything that we ultimately act on. we believe that in order to solve the country's fiscal solvency issues into the future, you've got to deal with the issue of entitlement reform. that's something so far the president has been reluctant to put on the table. so far what we've gotten out of him is this proposal to raise taxes which we think would be harmful to the economy.
servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >>
for international peace. we believe that our global economic interests and our foreign policy values are closely tied together. they should be closely tied together. and that's why we urge our colleagues to seize this opportunity that russia's succession to the world trade organization presents for both job creation and our ability to bind russia to a rule-based system of trade and dispute resolution. granting russia permanent normal trade relations is as much in our interest as it is in theirs. frankly, that's what ought to guide the choices that we make in the senate. the up side of this policy is clear on an international landscape. it is one that really offers this kind of what i would call, frankly, a kind of one-sided trade deal, one that promises billions of dollars in new u.s. exports and thousands of new jobs in america that is certainly in our interest. russia is today the world's seventh-largest economy. having officially joined the w.t.o. on august 22, russia is now required by its membership in the w.t.o. to lower tariffs and to open up to new imports. that sudden jump in market acc
of the treasury, he was deputy secretary during president bush and happened to be a senior foreign policy ambassador to germany and is one of the very few people who synthesizes the economic and national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat who was one of the reasons i moved to washington, really great to have bob here. to michael porter's right ahead douglas holtz-eakin iran the congressional budget office and is a distinguished economist. he was john mccain's economic adviser in the first campaign. he is now running the american action forum. he is one of the best hot shots on fiscal issues but does it kindly and then we have steve case. i wanted to give him chairmanship of the jobs council, jeff immelt had that but not for long. steve case, one of the founders and chairman of aol, he chairs the entrepreneurship council, chairman of revolution, very tied up in trying to think about what are the spark the drive innovation, creativity, how do you drive young people here. you have been involved in a major study, u.s. competitive project at harvard business school.
these policy issues. in your role now, what do you think is the most critical issue in foreign policy at this point? >> well, there are a series of them. i do think that one has to deal with the issue of continuing terrorism in certain places and as we've already raised, the nuclear proliferation issue. i also -- my personal belief is that the gap between the rich and the poor is something that is a national security issue and needs to be looked at. and what i'm doing here in turkey is being present atten infrastructure conference which does talk about the importance of providing infrastructure in developing countries because it's really a way to pursue giving the people what they need. i believe democracy has to deliver and infrastructure is one of the deliverables that really proves that we can help each over and eliminates what is a basic injustice as this gap between the rich and the poor. >> internal difficulties to overcome, as well. madeleine albright former u.s. secretary of state. thank you again for your time this morning. >>> now if you're just joining us, a reminder these
at the foreign policies. where are we in economic transition. absolutely nowhere. so i think the japanese have learned after three years of lost time that they do need to move things forward. okay ldp not being the best, we all know that however, in saying that, they at least know how to implement the policies. >> what's the policy of any significant change of monetary after the election compared to what tell like to see happen? >> there will be much stronger imposed. ldp is already verbally putting this on. it's almost a race who can put more pressure to bank of japan in the sense that they can alleviate the market. of course from a westerner's point of view, i'm sure in a dangerous move that they were asserting far too much pressure to central banks. but that's exactly almost like a tool that's been used for many of the parties involved to get elected right now in japan. >> all right. thank you. good to see you. on the asian agenda tomorrow, third quarter growth figures. india, a check on the country's services industry. and on the political front, as well, parliament gets ready to vote on a
that he has on foreign policy in the republican senate caucus? mika and i talked to so many people over the past two, three years that say we want, republican senators, we want out of afghanistan but, you know what, we just sort of stay out of john's way. how many times have we heard that? >> a lot. it's disturbing. >> we hear it all the time. they stay out of his way. are they going to blindly follow and, again, i love and respect senator mccain, but i don't want my party to blindly follow him over a cliff on this battle especially if it's a personal one. >> well, on this battle it may be a personal one. i think the answer to your broader question is that republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the museum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more engagement, more involvement. so there are a lot of big issues that he has huge influence on because of his experiences, his personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on. two of the three s
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we talked about medical savings through the programs, address rising national expenditure. will have more to say on taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today who has played such a fundamental role over the last several years. been part of literally every negotiation that has taken place. he still an optimist, so i think that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in
life-saving assistance, whether they support children, strengthen food security or advance u.s. foreign policy. we also consider operational issues including efficient management and oversight. this case by case analysis ensures that there is careful consideration of the context surrounding a proposed activity. before the coup, usaid was the largest donor supporting leches in mali. programs trained poll workers and improved elections monitoring systems, strengthened political parties and provided voter education. when the electoral support activities resumed, providing the consent of congress, it will help support free an fair elections in mali and a peaceful political exit from the current situation. a key issue will be ensuring the inclusion and participation of the internally displaced personals and refugees in the political process. we plan to expand our elections assistance programming to include broader civic engagement activities, to support national reconciliation as part of the return to an inclusive democratic maliian society. the only usaid supported economic growth activitie
or gun control or foreign policy. not everybody is a single issue voter. >> no. not everybody is and, you know, give him the benefit of the doubt. let's give him the benefit of the doubt. take a step back. the issue is whether it's warren buffet worth 50 million pointing down at us and saying, hum. maybe the threshold should be 500,000 instead of 250,000. i don't know about you. but when i see the automatic pilot, and thank god it is for the business community to have accountants, mr. buffet doesn't do his own taxes. i doubt mr. senegal does. they all know this and they operate in a world where they preach to us what they believe is a middle class friendly gospel. but they don't really believe it. >> rick, this argument presumes that mr. senegal voted for the special dividend this year based on his own pocketbook. there are still millions of shareholders -- >> i'm not saying that at all. i'm saying that if you really believe, listen, if it was me, if it was me, i would take that money and donate it and i would call the president to urge him to make it retroactive because obviously they're
-service tonight here on c-span. next, the israeli foreign minister talks about the impediments to peace in the region. speaking from the saban center for middle east policy, this is about an hour. >> we meet at a time of great turmoil and the middle east. just after the presidential election and the united states. two weeks ago, we were looking at the prospect of canceling the forum because of the war that was going on with hamas and gaza. thankfully, calm has been restored. hopefully it is a lasting calm. every day brings dramatic news from the middle east. yesterday, the plo won recognition as a non-member observer state. egyptians were in the street demonstrating against their newly elected muslim brotherhood president's latest decrees. this evening, the governor of israel announced 3000 new settlements. how is the united states and israel to cope with all of these dramatic developments? how is the united states and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle e
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)